Monday, June 14, 2010

A Bridge Not Too Far

There's a mighty bridge that crosses the Thames River and connects New London to the rest of the world, but I am loathe to cross it. Unless I'm going to Watch Hill I just see no reason to cross over to Rotten Groton.

Last week, though, all that changed. Mistah packed us a picnic, including a lovely bottle of Corey Creek Rosé from our friend Mr. Dibble . . .

Mr. Dibble focuses on being "up the Creek." Me, I focus on the better part of the wine's name.

Anyway, Mistah packed chairs and snacks and wine, picked me up at the Tavern, and off we went to Eastern Point Park.

Who knew Groton could be so lovely?

Who knew Eastern Point Park was so fabulous?

Plus, we were able to keep a close watch on our ol' friend Ledgie -- from the other side of the river.

It was a beautiful . . .

. . . and very relaxing day.

Westy loved it too.

My birthday Bucket of Love became our new Westy picnic bucket, which worked out just perfectly.

Oh, how I love a picnic.

We watched the water . . .

. . . we watched the ferries come and go . . .

. . . and come and go.

They don't call the high-speed ferry high speed for nothing, you know.

We watched sailboats . . .

. . . and fishing boats . . .

. . . and lots of birdies.

Birds and boats and boats and birds . . .

Then a crazy thick fog blew in and Ledgie disappeared.

. . . but then, thankfully, reappeared. Phew. That was a close one.

It was a fabulous day out there on the Other Side of the River.

Maybe it's not a bridge not too far, afterall.

10 comments:

XUP said...

It's good to get out your Rose- coloured glasses every once in a while and see things from a different perspective, isn't it?

Dawnie said...

On the way to work, I often travel along the water in Groton. Sometimes, I walk to Eastern Point. Other times, I weave my way through the rich history of the Fort neighborhood. To the uninitiated, Groton is Hamburger Mile and the Subase. But the quiet beauty of the City of Groton is another matter altogether, isn't it? Thanks for sharing.

Jacquie said...

Lovely day! I think I could drink that bottle of chilly pink joy in one big sip.

xoxo

Jacquie

martyjoco said...

I too walk along the shore in both Groton & New London, and Eastern Point was the beach of my first four summers. It's a grand view and a wonderful place. I must say, I have NEVER seen that little orange-billed seabirdy, on either side of the river! We must find out who he is! Way cool!! Nice work, photographer!

Me, You, or Ellie said...

Lovely, lovely.

And I agree, XUP, it IS good to put on your rose-colored glasses. As often as possible.

beth

Me, You, or Ellie said...

Rosé colored glasses, Beth.

Thanks, y'all. I love my 2 local girls' takes on the town they work in . . .

Ellie

Me, You, or Ellie said...

Yes, that's what I meant, and what XUP meant too, I'm guessing. Rosé. Rosé. Rosé.

beth

Me, You, or Ellie said...

From now on I am always going to say Rosé-colored glasses. I love that.

E.

Mom C said...

Pretty Woman....

martyjoco said...

I found the bird! Definitely the guy; you could substitute the m&y&e photo for the drawing in my Eastern Birds guide.

American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus). 17-21 inches. Large, chunky [chunky??] pied shorebird, black above and white below. Shows bold, white wing-bar in flight. Long, thick bill is red, strong legs are pink. Voice: loud kleep. Habitat: Mud flats, shorelines. Range: Breeds from New England southwards along Atlantic Coast and a few spots on the Gulf Coast. Leaves northern coasts in winter.